Thursday, October 9, 2008

Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery

After Chris returned from Iraq the second time, we took a family vacation to Washington DC. Our first stop was Arlington National Cemetery. I was speechless. From the changing of the guards, the sunset, the view, the history.....pictures don't even describe the emotions you feel when you arrive and walk around. Unfortunately we know people that are now buried in Arlington...but we are also fortunate, because we were honored to know them and my husband was honored to serve with them. I'm setting the DVR for this. It's something we all should watch.

Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery

is the third in a trilogy of Iraq-related HBO documentaries (following the Emmy-winning “Baghdad ER” and the Emmy nominated “Alive Day Memories: Home from Iraq”) from Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill which provides rare, intimate glimpses of the loss, love and pride felt by the Section 60 visitors. Capturing the sights and sounds of this quiet pocket of Arlington National Cemetery, mourners ranging from young widows and family members to fianc├ęs and fellow soldiers visit Section 60 to try and connect in spiritual and physical ways with the loved ones they’ve lost. Whether it’s a father camping out at his son’s grave with a bottle of bourbon and a cigar or a widowed mother whose daughter just learned how to walk, Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery comprises vignettes of these individual stories shot from early morning to sundown (when the site officially closes).

Since the Civil War, Arlington National Cemetery has been the nation’s preeminent burial ground for military personnel. Over 300,000 people are buried in an area of more than 600 acres, including veterans from all the nation’s wars. Funerals average 28 a day, with about 6,400 burials annually. Nearly four million people visit Arlington each year.

You can preview the documentary here: http://www.hbo.com/docs/programs/section60/index.html

5 comments:

Uncle Dan said...

I am sure that I also know people there as well as the Viet Nam Wall. I don't think I could walk those hallowed grounds without out remembering them. I did serve with one of the Old Guard Soldiers though.

The Mrs. said...

So sad, so powerful...

Anonymous said...

DVR it for me so I can watch it, too.

Web CRM said...

well this is really powerful and sad.

rose_michelle said...

We went to visit my grandfather at the VA Hospital in Houston and it was so moving to see all the injured veterans there ... it was no long elderly men sharing old war stories, but young men sad of those they left behind in this war.